Monthly Archives: January 2010

Beware the V-shaped forecast, when the bottom of the V is “today”. Consider th

Beware the V-shaped forecast, when the bottom of the V is “today”. Consider the red curve, production. The EIA’s forecast has us reversing 40 years of decline, returning to the 1970 level of liquids production in just 25 years. How … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Image 6

Posted in Uncategorized

Now this graph is remarkable. It’s pretty much an admission by EIA that the Congress

Now this graph is remarkable. It’s pretty much an admission by EIA that the Congressionally-mandated 2007 Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) goal of 35 billion gallons of ethanol usage per year by 2022 will not be met. Not only that, EIA arrived … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

An interesting bar chart that illustrates a point I wrote about recently in a RedState blog calle

An interesting bar chart that illustrates a point I wrote about recently in a RedState blog called The Big Energy Lie. “Resources” and “reserves” are not interchangeable terms. Reserves are quantities known with relative certainty that can be recovered or … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Several interesting things to note here. EIA takes the AGA Potential Gas Committee estimate of re

Several interesting things to note here. EIA takes the AGA Potential Gas Committee estimate of resources seriously. There is a large growth projected in shale gas, which they expect will keep prices low and actually depress exploration and development of … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Note that the figures on the graph show the percentages of each fuel used to generate electricity.

Note that the figures on the graph show the percentages of each fuel used to generate electricity. The slide title is true, but misleading; coal’s share declines, but actual coal usage is forecast to increase by over 15% from 2008 … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

This graph depicts how the EIA thinks we’ll be ramping up our use of renewable energy for e

This graph depicts how the EIA thinks we’ll be ramping up our use of renewable energy for electrical generation over the next 25 years. Notice how the use of windmills grows explosively over the first four years, then abruptly stops. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized